1904-2004 Centennial projects

1904-2004 Centennial projects

In 2005 JRCT marked the centenary of the Trust by funding a number of Centennial projects:

Visionaries for a just and peaceful world

Seven individuals were freed up to pursue their ideas for making the world - or just a part of it - more just and more peaceful. Chosen from more than 1600 applicants, the project provided the recipients with the support necessary to pursue their vision for five years. The scheme came to an end in 2010 and is recorded in the book Visions of the Future: Six Stories 

The six visionaries are:

  • Karen Chouhan - economic equality for black communities in Britain
  • Roy Head - saving millions of lives through health messages in the mass media
    www.developmentmedia.net
  • Heather Parker and Mark Hinton - bridge-building between local communities around the world
  • Carne Ross - a voice for the powerless: independent diplomacy
    www.independentdiplomat.org
  • Clive Stafford Smith - bringing the rule of law back to Guantanamo Bay
    www.reprieve.org.uk
  • Geoff Tansey - fair play in food
    www.tansey.org.uk

 

POWER: An independent inquiry into Britain's democracy

A joint centenary project of Joseph Rowntree Charitable Trust and the Joseph Rowntree Reform Trust, the POWER Inquiry sought to address the question - how can political participation and involvement in the UK be increased and deepened?

Through public engagement, research and a high profile commission, the Inquiry set out to explore the causes of disillusionment with the political system and examine new approaches to political participation. The findings are published in the report Power to the People

 

Centennial Fellows

In preparation for the centenary, the Trust funded four one-year post-doctoral fellowships at the University of York to undertake the first independent academic studies of the Trust's history and work. The fellowships were:

  • Jonathan Davies: Democracy programme
  • Mark Freeman: The first 50 years
  • Lisa O'Malley: JRCT and social policy
  • Lorna Gold: Quakers and conflict